Everton Greatest XI vs Chelsea Greatest XI: Who Wins?

Chelsea visit Goodison Park this weekend in need of a win to put last week's second half collapse to the back of their mind, a rejuvenated Everton will provide stiff opposition. Can the same be said for both sides' greatest ever XI's according to these two fans...
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
19
Chelsea visit Goodison Park this weekend in need of a win to put last week's second half collapse to the back of their mind, a rejuvenated Everton will provide stiff opposition. Can the same be said for both sides' greatest ever XI's according to these two fans...

404

Chelsea visit Goodison Park this weekend in need of a win to put last week's second half collapse to the back of their mind, a rejuvenated Everton will provide stiff opposition. Can the same be said for both sides' greatest ever XI's?

Everton Greatest Xl by Biff Bifferson

GK: Neville Southall

First up these are only players I’ve seen but even so the magnificent, contrary, scruffbag, maestro would be in any all time ace Everton list. Has there ever been a player so good yet so completely at odds with his status? Considered by many to be the best in the world in the mid to late 1980s – I can’t say as I never saw all the others – he was at times unbeatable. Ask John Barnes. Football Writers’ Player of the Year in 1984/5. 9

RB: Ian Snodin

This is a controversial choice but I’m still mad at Gary Stevens for the pass that let Ronnie Whelan in at the 1986 cup final. Snodin came from Leeds United as a midfielder and he was alright there, but when he filled in at right back for a spell he was superb. Fast, aggressive and smart, he made the position his own and was called up for England but had to withdraw when injury knackered him. 7

CB: Dave Watson

Wretched at first – a Guardian match report on one of his early games (probably by Ian Ross) reckoned he and Kevin Ratcliffe weren’t on first-name terms yet – he became one of Everton’s most important post-war players. Rock solid, rock hard and fond of unorthodox refuelling methods, Watson was superb. Lifted the FA Cup as captain in 1995 and once ruffled Michael Owen’s hair when the little s*** was whining. 8

CB: Joleon Lescott

Most people my age would go for Kevin Ratcliffe here, and he was a good player and our most successful skipper, but Lescott was simply brilliant for us. His defection basically finished football for me. Good on the floor, good in the air, fast and with an incredible knack for scoring (big) goals, him leaving left a massive hole in my betting strategy. 8

LB: Pat Van den Hauwe

An absolute beast but a brilliant player. Once put Vince Hilaire over the advertising hoardings at Goodison with a spirited tackle. As Hilaire’s twitching torso was stretchered off people were whispering ‘I think he’s dead’. Also smashed through Jimmy ‘s***house’ Case after he’d fouled Adrian Heath or Trevor Steven (can’t remember which) when playing for Southampton. Scored the goal which clinched the 1987 championship at Norwich City. 8

RM: Andrei Kanchelskis

My god what a player. Twenty goals in 52 league appearances in just under two seasons, including a cracking brace at Anfield in a 2-1 win in November 1995. He was fast as fuck with a great shot and a fine head too. At times Kancheskis was unstoppable – then he got the a**e over a move to Fiorentina and that was that. 9

CM: Peter Reid

Described by Howard Kendall as Everton’s most important post-war signing. Paul Bracewell was arguably a better player but not as important. Reid wasn’t the quickest but he had everything else – he’d be priceless in today’s game. Although he’d get sent off a lot. Along with Kim Gordon and Jonny Marr, the only famous person I’d like to meet. Although we’d make an odd crowd. Marr would probably sneak off early having left his share of the bill but ‘forgetting’ the tip. 9

CM: Mikel Arteta

I was slow to warm to Arteta as I feel midfielders should be able to tackle, and it p***ed me off that he needed Lee Carsley in there to hold his hand at times. But the best little Spaniard was brilliant the last few seasons until he jogged onto London. 9

LM: Kevin Sheedy

Sheer brilliance. I don’t know who Liverpool had on the left in 1982 when Sheedy joined us but he must have been bloody brilliant. Sheedy wasn’t quick but he didn’t need to be because his touch, passing, crossing and shooting were so good. But it’s the free-kicks people remember, with many pointing to an FA Cup tie with Ipswich where he smashed it top corner, was told to retake, and smashed it in the other corner. Magic. 9

CF: Peter Beardsley

Along with Sheedy the most skilful Everton player I’ve ever seen. John Motson on Match of the Day when we played (I think) Coventry said: “You could take this first 30 minutes from Beardsley and put out a video called ‘how to play football’”. There’s no better sight than Beardsley shaking his hips, sending the defender the wrong way and then stroking the ball past a baffled keeper. 9

CF: Graeme Sharp
Everton’s post-war record goalscorer, Sharp scored some of the most important goals in the club’s most successful period, including the winner at Anfield in 1984/5, the first in the 1984 FA Cup final, and the equaliser in the home leg of the 1985 European Cup Winners’ Cup semi final against Bayern Munich. The Toffees went on to win 3-1 in a game regarded by many as Everton’s greatest ever. If you weren’t there you missed out because it was f***ing ace. 9

Total: 94

Chelsea’s Greatest XI by Laurence Ettridge

GK: Petr Cech

In my opinion still the best goalkeeper in the Premier League. Granted he has spent most of his time working behind one of Chelsea’s best defences but he has consistently pulled off superb saves when called upon – not to mention coming back as good as ever after that horrific head injury. 10

LB: Ashley Cole

Despite perhaps being one of the most hated men in football, Cole’s contributions down the left have been outstanding for Chelsea. Reliable in defence and always making strides to get forward – he probably puts in a harder shift than any other player. 10

CB: John Terry

Captain and talisman. What JT maybe lacks in agility these days he makes up for with his experience and reading of the game. A great presence on the pitch and has successfully marshalled one of the best defences the Premier League has seen to three league titles. 9

CB: Marcel Desailly

Often known as “the rock” Desailly provided a formidable strong presence in the heart of the Blues defence for six years and won an FA Cup in the process. 8

RB: Ron “Chopper” Harris

Just a little before my time but the recommendations of my dad have been duly noted to include a few Chelsea legends. Chopper appeared just shy of 800 times for the club, which is obviously a great service. He was often noted for his physical approach – particularly in the FA Cup final in 1970. 8

CM: Claude Makelele

He made the defensive role his own under Mourinho. In recent years the formation with a holding midfielder has by far worked the best for Chelsea and none have taken on the role as well as Makelele. He rarely ventured forward of the halfway line but achieved a 100% shots to goals ratio in the 06-07 season (one shot, one goal). 10

LM: Gianfranco Zola

Not many will ever look as good in a Chelsea shirt as Gianfranco Zola. Anchored by Makelele I can see him cutting in from the left at will, both creating and scoring in my hypothetical mang*sm of a team. An absolute boyhood hero, he was incredible – on the ball, from set-pieces, everywhere. The best.  10

CM: Dennis Wise

An almost purely nostalgic choice here. Wise was a little terrier of a player who Sir Alex Ferguson once described as being able to start a fight in an empty house. But seeing Dennis lift the FA Cup in 1997 as captain is a joy of a childhood memory. 8

RM: Alan Hudson

Another dad recommendation here. Hudson was an Osgood-era playmaker and played in every game in the lead up to the final in 1970 – in this diamond formation no doubt he would have been able to create great service to the front. 9

ST: Peter Osgood It doesn’t even take my old man to point me in the direction of this Chelsea legend. Peter Osgood – “The King of Stamford Bridge” and the only player to have a statue erected at the ground, he won the FA Cup and European Cup Winners’ Cup and scored over 150 goals for the club. 10

ST: Jimmy Greaves Yes, Torres has just missed the cut – would you believe it? I’ve decided to complete my 11 with another Chelsea legend. Although he won no trophies in his time at the Bridge he still holds the club record for the most goals scored in a season with 41. 9

Chelsea Total: 101

The Result: Everton 94 - 101 Chelsea

A massacre. The Toffees have been obliterated by the brilliance of Osgood and Greaves, and must have been wishing Fernando Torres had made the cut to spare their blushes. Beardsley and Sharp will have provided a glint of hope, but it seems that Mike Arteta had one of his 'off days' which were becoming all too frequent at the end of his spell at Goodison Park, Dennis Wise slipped him in his pocket and Chelsea walk out easy victors.

More recent stories that might interest you...

Everton’s Jose Baxter: Please Don’t Be The New Wayne Rooney

No Money, No Hope: The Everton Fans’ Guide To The Transfer Window

‘I Shouldn’t Have Been On the Same Pitch As Trevor Francis: 40 Years In Football With Mick ‘Baz’ Rathbone

QPR v Chelsea: Time To Put The Hoops Back In Their Box

Real Madrid, Inter, Chelsea, Porto: Why Jose Mourinho Will Never Be Considered A Great

Chelsea’s John Terry Is No Longer Needed By England

Click here for more Football and Sport stories

Click here to follow Sabotage Times on Twitter

Click here to follow Sabotage Times on Facebook