Allotmenteering: A Very British Phenomenon

Up and down the land, nearly half a million Great Britons nurture their private patch of ground with hundreds of thousands more on waiting lists desperate for a bit of grass to call their own...
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Up and down the land, nearly half a million Great Britons nurture their private patch of ground with hundreds of thousands more on waiting lists desperate for a bit of grass to call their own...


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The Brits’ home is their castle. Yet despite this, not every Brit has a garden. Do the Brits give up? Limiting themselves to a half-hearted window box growing flowers, carrots and a type of mould unidentifiable by modern science? No, of course not. The Brits do not wilt in the dark sun of deficiency, like the flowers he cannot grow. The Brits do the only logical thing they can do in such a situation. They rent out a patch of earth a few miles away from their homes and grow stuff there instead (as pictured above with Graham Tranter). Problem solved.

Yes, Britain loves allotments. Eastenders icon now deceased, Arthur Fowler, being the chiselled poster boy of the British Allotment Age. A particularly British phenomenon, “allotmenteering” offers green fingered, gardening enthusiasts the opportunity to grow vegetables and what not on their own personal plot. Up and down the land, nearly half a million Great Britons nurture their private patch of ground with hundreds of thousands more on waiting lists desperate for a bit of grass to call their own.

In our densely overcrowded towns and cities, Allotments feel like our mini British alternative to New York’s Central Park, just with a great deal more rhubarb.

Having one’s own allotment gives us the chance to be active all year round, tending the soil, growing potatoes and getting ready to do it all over again the following year. Even better, it is good for the environment too. In our densely overcrowded towns and cities, Allotments feel like our mini British alternative to New York’s Central Park, just with a great deal more rhubarb. What’s more it offers a chance to socialise and meet other keen gardeners while sharing tips on the best way to avoid the dreaded green fly.

It sounds brilliant doesn’t it? I mean, who wouldn’t want an allotment? A piece of land to call your own, a space to grow natures finest and a shed to sit in to avoid the wife or husband.

What’s the best thing you’ve grown on your allotment?

Click Here to see the rest of the things we love about Allotments

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