Futures' New Album: A Summer Must-Have

After releasing several songs as stand-alone tracks, British rockers Futures have released their debut album, and it doesn't disappoint. Here's why the album should be on your list this summer...
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After releasing several songs as stand-alone tracks, British rockers Futures have released their debut album, and it doesn't disappoint. Here's why the album should be on your list this summer...

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British rock band Futures have well and truly announced their arrival on the big stage with their debut album entitled “The Karma Album”, releasing it through their self-made label, Indigo. The band left Mercury Records in order to get their album out there, and the move certainly seems to have paid off, with it reaching number 1 in the iTunes rock charts.

The album features six songs that the band had released previously as stand-alone tracks on iTunes, with seven all-new tunes. Start a Fire kicks off the album, and is slightly darker and slower than the band’s usual stuff. It gives the release good variety, although they soon revert to something more familiar with Islands in the Sea up next.

The lyrics, in typical Futures style, are upbeat, and match the positive beat and tone of the song in general. In the next song, Karma Satellite, lead vocalist and guitarist Ant West breaks out the piano to slow things down a bit, and this adds some serenity to the buoyant rhythm of the track.

It says a lot about their versatility that they can switch styles so comfortably (*cough* – Coldplay...).

West is not only lead vocalist and guitarist, but is band manager, as well as working as a producer for other material. He’s desperate to take Futures to the top, and his relentless determination to keep in touch with every single fan is admirable. His distinctive voice gives the band a unique selling point, along with the fantastic lyrics which he writes.

The rest of the band should not go unnoticed though – Christian Ward, Casey Roarty and George Lindsay are all incredibly talented musicians, and their work has helped establish Futures’ music as something of a summer must-have. The blissful tunes they help to forge mean the album suits the season perfectly, and will be played across the country.

Get Out follows Karma Satellite, and is standard Futures – that same positive vibe is exuded through-out, which is currently making the band more and more revered across the globe. Their dedicated fan-base is increasing by the day, and when you give The Karma Album a listen, it’s easy to see why.

The guitar through-out is majestic, and the lyrics & vocals superb, although neither are particularly surprising with this band.

Up next is Indigo, which again slows things down. The song has a slightly more murky out-look, yet is still brilliant in its own right. It says a lot about their versatility that they can switch styles so comfortably (*cough* – Coldplay...).

The next track, Million Lights, was recently released by the quartet as a teaser before the album came out. It’s another slightly slower one, but is more relaxed and calm than its predecessors.

Say My Name starts off slightly shadowy, with West dropping the vocals quite low to build it up as another fairly sinister track. However, when it reaches the chorus, it’s back to the Futures trademark of bright, lively music, which altogether gives the song a nice contrast.

The band then brilliantly remaster old song The Boy Who Cried Wolf, picking up the pace a little and removing some of the backing vocals in places. It fits more with their changed style – less pop rock and more indie rock, so the slight tweaks are done well.

If you want more specific praise, rather than a bunch of adjectives, George Lindsay’s use of the ride cymbal and the hi-hat are exemplary as always.

Following that is Aeroplanes, another more gentle melody, although they crank things up near the end. The guitar through-out is majestic, and the lyrics & vocals superb, although neither are particularly surprising with this band.

The Rescue combines the tranquillity of previous songs with the catchy, up-beat nature of others, and is incredibly likeable. It’s a little more pop-styled than most of the album, but is still right up there.

The penultimate track, We Had It All, is probably the most chilled of all. No percussion is heard, and the song is slightly reminiscent of recent release Swim Teams. The melody fits well with the album and the peaceful vocals are very enjoyable.

Today We Had Love rounds the album off, with the band getting right back to routine Futures. If you want more specific praise, rather than a bunch of adjectives, George Lindsay’s use of the ride cymbal and the hi-hat are exemplary as always. The song gets off to a barn-storming start, beginning as it means to end, and is a superb way to end their debut album.

All-in-all, an incredibly successful first release from the boys from Buckinghamshire, and the move from Mercury to Indigo certainly seems to be paying off. And as West sings in Today We Had Love – this is only the start.

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