I Just Don't Get Porn

I'm fond of a frot and go weak at the knees at the sight of a topless Beckham, so why haven't I watched porn since I was a teenager...
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I'm fond of a frot and go weak at the knees at the sight of a topless Beckham, so why haven't I watched porn since I was a teenager...

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Since the very beginning of time, man has had a fervent desire to watch other members of his species exploring and teasing each other’s sexual desires. The earliest cave paintings are not, in fact, of hunter-gatherers capturing wooly mammoths, but of a caveman and a cavewoman indulging in a little bit of how’s your father.

The Ancient Greeks carried on with the tradition by decorating their world-famous amphorae with imagery of their Olympic Games. The best examples of this were ones where two athletes could be seen fencing. Closer to home, our own Calendonian cousins were renowned for their depictions of tossing the caber.

As technology progressed, so the level of detail of this titillating imagery got more developed. In the Victorian era, the first recorded use of the photograph was to take a scandalous picture of Queen Victoria’s ankle. Into the 20th century, first cinema, then video, DVD and most recently the internet have all been jumped on by the porn industry to satisfy the most base cravings of modern man. This industry is leading the charge in the digital age - the people behind it are pioneers.

But you see before you, a woman whose first experience of watching pornography was as a 14 year-old-virgin at a friend’s house when one of the boys had a copy of Debbie Does Dallas. Other features of that night were: Archer’s and lemonade, vodka hidden in a shampoo bottle that tasted of the Body Shop strawberry flavouring, and someone puking their guts up into the swimming pool.

More...

How I Became A Female Porn Junkie

Watching Porn With Strangers

I don’t know if it was the memory of the synthetic-tasting strawberry, the vomit or questionable choice of film, but to date, that remains my only encounter with the pornography industry. Realising this, two decades later, has made me think that it’s something I need to explore further. I feel that it is something that I should like. I’m a sexually liberated, modern woman. This blog has yet to discuss masturbation, but it’s something I do with lust and vigour on a regular basis. In fact, an early mission statement of my embryonic business plan was to get more women wanking (it currently stands at a shamefully low 80% compared to men’s 99%, with 1% lying).

And I have a diverse range of stimuli at my disposal: it took me only 25 pages into 50 Shades of Grey before I had to have a lie down; I feel stirrings in my most intimate region whenever I see a picture of a topless David Beckham. The posting dates for the Aussie Bum May outdoor campaign are noted in my diary on an annual basis, so clearly I have a natural lust for lusty media.

My mind and body are hard-wired to respond favourably to a hard cock. So is there something in me that is missing when I don’t feel a desire to look at two (or more) people engaging in a carnal act?

I write as someone who has had their heart broken through pornography. A beloved ex-boyfriend ended our relationship because his love of porn was greater than his love of me. I had no idea what was happening all the time we were seeing each other; that there were these dark thoughts going on until the day he dumped me. If only we had been more open about things, if only he had realised that he could have spoken to be candidly about his obsession, then things might have worked out. But they didn’t, and it’s partly because of that that I decided to meet Justin Ribiero dos Santos, proprietor of adult entertainment empire, Joybear Pictures. If porn could be so destructive to my own relationship, is it having the same impact on others? Or is it, in fact, actually having a positive effect?

To be continued...