Vinyl Me Please Is A Wet Dream For Record Lovers

One for the heads...
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One for the heads...

vinyl-me-please

With over £20 million’s worth of vinyl sold in 2015 compared to £3 million five years ago, people’s love for wax and grooves has never been bigger.

Although the record never died in the eyes of the purists and the DJs, for the rest of us its appeal got diluted in the 80s, 90s and 00s by smaller, more portable vessels.

Then along came digital and everything was in a computer and was free. Glory days indeed, but for those of for whom music was always more than just pretty sound waves, digital just ain’t enough. Thus, vinyl came back in from the charity shop window.

It’s in the artwork - though no amount of sleeve-scanning will ever help me get Tilt but also in the physical thing; that feeling of exclusivity, a declaration. “I like music. So I do. Here: this vinyl, look, this vinyl is the proof. I have appreciation for art, music and a wider sensitivity that this musician understands and can reveal to the world in a way that I cannot. Now. Take off my pants, Gary.”

And then of course there’s the desire to see musicians get paid for the blisters on their fingers.

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All of which makes Vinyl Me Please pretty much the ideal company for the post - CD generation.

Vinyl Me Please (V.M.P) is an online music club that monthly sends out a 45inch of their choosing to subscribers. That vinyl will be a special edition pressing, exclusive to V.M.P, and come with artwork that again is unique to the release. To confirm. I’ve just used the words ‘exclusive’ and ‘unique’ in the same sentence there. Eaaaaasy now.

It also comes with an especially created cocktail recipe and a big ass box your neighbours will definitely notice, but what I really like about it is that you don’t know what the record is going to be that month. Once you sign up you have to trust the guys behind the company to not fuck with your greenbacks.

Fortunately, so far they’ve proved themselves to be of delectably eclectic taste, with the likes of Father John Misty, Madvillain, Thelonious Monk, J Dilla and Sylvan Esso all hitting subscriber’s doormats.

Best way I can describe it: you know that mate of yours whose music taste you always trusted when you were a teenager? The one that would say ‘you’ve got to borrow this’ before handing you Grace, or There’s Riot A Goin’ On, or London’s Calling in a case that bore the scratches of a hundred days in his backpack?  Well it’s like that. ‘Cept you don’t have to give it back.

The Vinyl Me Please website is here.